Course Name Code Semester T+U Hours Credit ECTS
Linguistics ELT 109 1 3 + 0 3 4
Precondition Courses <p>None</p>
Recommended Optional Courses <p>None</p>
Course Language English
Course Level Bachelor's Degree
Course Type Compulsory
Course Coordinator Prof.Dr. FİRDEVS KARAHAN
Course Lecturers
Course Assistants

Res. Asst. Ali İlya

 

Course Category Available Basic Education in the Field
Course Objective

The general aim of this course is to introduce the nature of language to the future foreign language teachers and help them have a general understanding of what language actually is.

 

With respect to the specific aims, there are several aims of this course: (1) First of all, the present course aims to familiarize them with the biological bases of language and language development in human beings and other species (e.g., animals) by presenting a thorough discussion of the differences between animal communication and human languages. (2) Secondly, this course aims to introduce the definition, content, usage and research areas of language as well as fundamental linguistic concepts.  (3) Another aim of this course is to acquaint the future foreign language teachers with the sounds of English language covered in the IPA chart (International Phonetic Alphabet) and their characteristics  (e.g. voiced and voiceless sounds, place of articulation, consonant sounds, manner of articulation, vowels, etc.), and the sound patterns of language (e.g. phonology, phonemes, phonemes and allophones, minimal pairs, phonotactics, syllables, coarticulation effects, etc.). (4) Fourthly, this course aims to familiarize future foreign language teachers with the traditional subfields (i.e., sub-branches) of linguistics including Phonetics (the study of the production, acoustics and hearing of speech sounds), Phonology (the patterning of sounds), Morphology (the structure of words), Syntax  (the structure of sentences), and Semantics (the study of meaning), and their use in foreign language teaching. The combination of theory and practice will be stimulated through extensive analysis and investigation of linguistic data, which would also help the students develop their critical thinking skills.


Moreover, this course aims (5) to familiarize future foreign language teachers with the traditional subfields (i.e., sub-branches) of linguistics including Pragmatics (language in context) and Discourse Analysis, and their use in foreign language teaching. Furthermore, it aims (6) to familiarize the students with the relationship between language and the brain as well as to help them learn the concepts and principles of Neurolinguistics. (7)  It also aims to teach the underlying processes and different theories that account for not only first language acquisition but also second language acquisition/learning. (8) The course also aspires to help the student to gain a firm understanding of language history, its change over time, and the diversity of languages with a focus on the English language. Within this scope, it is also aimed to teach the different accents and dialects of English spoken around the world. Moreover, (9) another aim is to help the students comprehend the influence of regional, social, and cultural factors on language. Lastly, (10) it aims to teach the relationship among language, culture, and society by focusing on the discussion of how closely they are intertwined and interdependent.

Course Content

The present course, Linguistics, covers the field of linguistics, in which several important selected topics are covered. The core of this course includes the origins of language, as well as the general laws and principles that govern the structure of languages with a specific focus on the English language. What language is, and the properties and functions of language are among the content covered in this course. What communication refers to, and the communication of other species (e.g. animals) are also covered in this course. Furthermore, the similarities and differences between animal communication and human languages are included and discussed in detail. The biological bases of language and human language development are also covered in depth. The definition, content, usage and research areas of language as well as fundamental linguistic concepts are among the other points to be emphasized throughout the course. Most importantly, the traditional subfields (i.e., sub-branches) of linguistics and their use in foreign language teaching are covered in this course: Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, and Semantics. The course also includes the coverage of IPA chart (International Phonetic Alphabet) by an extensive practice with the transcription of sounds. All in all, all of these content are covered in the coursework of Linguistics I, and the students receive a solid foundation for the field of Linguistics.

 

This course also primarily focuses on the process of language development and change. The content of the course includes having a thorough understanding of the processes of first language acquisition and second language acquisition/learning. The course continues elaborating upon the other subfields (i.e., sub-branches) of linguistics including Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis. Afterward, the field of Neurolinguistics and the relationship between language and the brain (language areas in the brain, tongue tips and slips, aphasia, the critical period) are covered in depth. The relevance of the field of linguistics to language acquisition theories and language teaching methods is also among the topics covered in this course. The course content also elaborates upon how languages develop as well as the theoretical perspectives on how first language acquisition and second language acquisition/learning take place. Accordingly, the underlying processes and different theories that account for both first language acquisition and second language acquisition/learning are covered briefly. The remainder of the course focuses on language history and change, language families, and the influence of regional, social, and cultural factors on language, all of which are discussed in depth. The history of English including Old English, Middle English, Early Modern, and Modern English as well as the diversity of languages, and different accents and dialects of English are also elaborated upon within this course. The relationship among language, culture, and society is among the contents which are covered as a part of this course.

# Course Learning Outcomes Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
1 are acquainted with the important linguistic and technical terms, and crucial linguistic concepts within the scope of the field of Linguistics, and explain and use them appropriately where and when necessary. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
2 learn and explain the physiological and biological basis of the language. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Case Study, Testing, Homework,
3 learn the underlying universal principles and mechanisms of communication (i.e., learn the science behind how we communicate). Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
4 explain the properties of human language as well as explain the differences between animal and human language. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Simulation, Testing, Homework,
5 have a firm knowledge of the subfields of traditional Linguistics (Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, and Discourse Analysis) Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Group Study, Self Study, Testing, Homework, Performance Task,
6 learn and describe the basic patterns and rules of Phonetics (articulatory, acoustic, and auditory phonetics) by learning the speech sounds of a language as well as their properties Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework, Performance Task,
7 know the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) chart and are able to make phonetic transcription by working with (and analyzing) linguistic data. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
8 learn and describe the systems and patterns of speech sounds in English language (Phonology) Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
9 learn and describe the basic patterns and rules of word formation in English language Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
10 engage with the analysis of raw linguistic data and applies the techniques used in the analysis of language. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Demonstration, Motivations to Show, Group Study, Case Study, Self Study, Testing, Homework, Performance Task,
11 define and explain the concepts and principles of Neurolinguistics. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
12 know and explain the process of language acquisition and second language acquisition/learning as well as know their main stages. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
13 know the process of language development in human beings. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Testing, Homework,
14 know the history of language, and its change throughout time. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Case Study, Testing, Homework,
15 are able to explain how regional, social, and cultural characteristics affect language and lead to language change. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Case Study, Testing, Homework,
16 explain the influence of language on culture and society. Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Drilland Practice, Case Study, Testing, Homework,
Week Course Topics Preliminary Preparation
1 Introduction to the course, The origins of language Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 1: The origins of language)
2 Animals and human language (Communication, properties of human language, talking to animals, chimpanzees and language, using language) Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 2: Animals and human language)
3 The sounds of language & The sound patterns of language Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 3: The sounds of language, Chapter 4: The sound patterns of language)
4 Word formation & Morphology Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 5: Word formation, Chapter 6: Morphology)
5 Grammar Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 7: Grammar)
6 Syntax Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 8: Syntax)
7 Semantics Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 9: Semantics)
8 Midterm
9 Pragmatics Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 10: Pragmatics)
10 Discourse Analysis Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 11: Discourse analysis)
11 Language and the brain (Neurolinguistics, language areas in the brain, tongue tips and slips, aphasia, the critical period) Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 12: Language and the brain)
12 Language history and change Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 17: Language history and change)
13 Language and regional variation & Language and social variation Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 18: Language and regional variation, Chapter 19: Language and social variation)
14 Language and culture Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (Chapter 20: Language and culture)
Resources
Course Notes <p>Akmajian, A. &amp; R.A. Demers, A.K. Farmer, R.M. Harnish. (1997). An Introduction to Language and Communication. USA: The MIT Press.</p> <p>Benham, B. (1996). Studying Linguistics: A workbook. AEIN Publication.</p> <p>Chomsky, N. (2002). Syntactic structures (2nd ed.). Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.</p> <p>Crystal, D. (2005). How language works. London: Penguin Books Ltd.</p> <p>Crystal, D. (2011). A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics (6th ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.</p> <p>Finch, G. (2000). Linguistic terms and concepts. New York: Palgrave.</p> <p>Hudson, G. 2000. Essential Introductory Linguistics. UK: Blackwell.</p> <p>McManis, C.D., Stollenwerk, Z., &amp; Zheng-Sheng. (1987). Language Files. USA: Advocate Publishing Group.</p> <p>Meyer, C. F. (2009). Introducing English Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.</p> <p>Pinker, S. (2007). The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language. New York, NY: Harper Perennial Modern Classics.</p> <p>Radford, A., Atkinson, M., Britain, D., Clahsen, H., &amp; Spencer, A. &nbsp;(2009). Linguistics: an introduction (2nd Ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.</p> <p>Romaine, S. (2000). Language in Society: An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.</p> <p>Tercanlıoğlu, L. (1999). Linguistics for TEFL students. Erzurum: Atat&uuml;rk &Uuml;niversitesi Yayınları.</p> <p>Todd, L. (1987). An Introduction to Linguistics. Singapore: Longman.</p> <p>Trask, R.L. (1999). Language: The Basics (2nd ed.). GB: Routledge.</p>
Course Resources

Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., & Hyams, N. (2011). An introduction to language (9th ed.). Canada: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.

Yule, G. (2010). The study of language (4th ed.). GB: Cambridge University Press.

 

Order Program Outcomes Level of Contribution
1 2 3 4 5
1 A graduate of the department is able to plan teaching processes.
2 A graduate of the department possesses the skill in organizing appropriate environments for English teaching.
3 A graduate of the department can evaluate materials and resources that are relevant to English teaching with a critical viewpoint.
4 A graduate of the department employs appropriate methods and techniques for English teaching.
5 A graduate of the department decides on the feasibility of software and other technological resources to be utilized in English teaching
6 A graduate of the department chooses the suitable learning strategies considering the personal traits of the students.
7 A graduate of the department develops writing, reading, speaking and listening skills of the students.
8 A graduate of the department uses measurement and assessment instruments in an effective way.
9 A graduate of the department generates solutions for the educational, social and economic problems of the society.
10 A graduate of the department questions to what degree s/he possesses the required qualifications of a teacher.
11 A graduate of the department follows the academic studies conducted in the field for his personal development.
12 A graduate of the department conveys his ideas on the significance of intercultural communication in the process of learning English as a foreign language.
13 A graduate of the department indicates the ways of digging up information that are compulsory for life-long learning.
14 A graduate of the department generates foreign language tests.
15 A graduate of the department designs original activities promoting the use of English in the daily life.
Evaluation System
Semester Studies Contribution Rate
1. Ara Sınav 40
1. Ödev 20
1. Kısa Sınav 20
1. Performans Görevi (Uygulama) 20
Total 100
1. Yıl İçinin Başarıya 50
1. Final 50
Total 100
ECTS - Workload Activity Quantity Time (Hours) Total Workload (Hours)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours) 16 3 48
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 16 2 32
Mid-terms 1 2 2
Quiz 1 1 1
Assignment 1 5 5
Final examination 1 2 2
Performance Task (Application) 1 10 10
Total Workload 100
Total Workload / 25 (Hours) 4
dersAKTSKredisi 4