Course Name Code Semester T+U Hours Credit ECTS
Theories Of International Relations (En) ODC 517 0 3 + 0 3 6
Precondition Courses
Recommended Optional Courses
Course Language Turkish
Course Level yuksek_lisans
Course Type Optional
Course Coordinator Arş.Gör. FURKAN HALİT YOLCU
Course Lecturers Prof.Dr. TUNCAY KARDAŞ,
Course Assistants
Course Category
Course Objective

This module examines IR theories. In the first half of the semester, students will be exposed to a range of different theoretical approaches to International Relations. In the second half of the semester, students will be required to research and present case-studies to the class, which apply different methodological approaches to practical historical examples. Through these case studies and comparisons, students will gain a better understanding of how different government structures react to events in the international environment, and respond to external influences.

Course Content

1: General Introduction and information on course requirements
International Relations and Social Science
2: Normative International Relations Theory
3: Classical Realism
4: Structural Realism
5: Liberalism, Neoliberalism
6: The English School
7: Marxism
8: Critical Theory
9: Constructivism
10: Feminism
11: Poststructuralism
12::Postcolonialism
13: Green Theory

# Course Learning Outcomes Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
1 Learns the theories of the IR Lecture, Question-Answer, Discussion, Testing, Oral Exam, Homework,
Week Course Topics Preliminary Preparation
1 General Introduction and information on course requirements International Relations and Social Science
2 Normative International Relations Theory
3 Classical Realism
4 Structural Realism
5 Liberalism, Neoliberalism
6 The English School
7 Marxism
8 Critical Theory
9 Constructivism
10 Feminism
11 Poststructuralism
12 Postcolonialism
13 Green Theory
14 International Relations Theory and Globalization
Resources
Course Notes
Course Resources

• Tim Dunne, Milja Kurki, and Steve Smith: International Relations Theories, Oxford University Press, 2013.
• Robert Jackson and Georg Sørense: Introduction to International Relations Theories and Approaches, Oxford University Press,2012
• Alexander Wendt. 1992. “Anarchy Is What Stats Make of It: The Social Construction of Power Politics.” International Organization 46(2): 391-425
• Axelrod, Robert (1984). The Evolution of Cooperation, New York: Basic Books, pp. 3-105, 145-91.
• Bull, Hedley. 1977. The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics. Columbia U. Press., chs. 1,2,10.
• Doyle, Michael. 1986. “Liberalism in World Politics.” American Political Science Review 80 (4): 1151-69
• Fearon, James (1991). “Counterfactuals and Hypothesis Testing in Political Science,” World Politics, 43 (2), January: 169-95.
• Fearon, James and Alexander Wendt. 2002. “Rationalism v. Constructivism: A Skeptical View,” in Walter Carlsnaes, Thomas Risse, and Beth A. Simmons, editors, Handbook of International Relations (London: Sage), 5372
• Finnemore. 1996. National Interests in International Society. Cornell U. Press.
• Hopf, Ted. 2002. Social Construction of International Politics: Identities and Foreign Policies, Moscow 1955 and 1999. Cornell U. Press, ch. 1
• Jervis, Robert. “Cooperation Under the Security Dilemma,” World Politics, 1978.
• John Mearsheimer. 2001. The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. New York: W.W. Norton Company. (TGPP)
• Keohane, Robert and Judith Goldstein (1993). Ideas and Foreign Policy, Cornell University Press, chs. 1, 7.
• Keohane, Robert, ed. Neorealism and Its Critics. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1986), chs. 6,7.
• Krasner, Stephen. 1999 Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy. 1-42 and 153-219.
• Lake, David, and Robert Powell, eds. 1999. Strategic Choice and International Relations (Princeton U. Press), chs by Lake and Powell, Frieden, and Rogowski.
• Lake, David. 1996. “Anarchy, Hierarchy, and the Variety of International Relations,” International Organization, 50(1).
• Levy, Jack (1992). “Learning and Foreign Policy: Sweeping Through a Conceptual Minefield” International Organization, 48, 2, Spring, 279-312. (Review)
• Mearsheimer, John. 2001. The Tragedy of Great Power Politics. NY: Norton. Chapters 1-3.
• Morgenthau, Hans. 1985. Politics among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace (6th ed.), Knopf, pp. 1-51.
• Powell, Robert. 1991. “Absolute and Relative Gains in International Relations Theory.” American Political Science Review 85 (4): 1303 – 1320.
• Robert Keohane, ed. 1986. Neo-Realism and Its Critics. New York: Columbia University Press. (NIC)
• Robert Keohane. 1984. After Hegemony: Cooperation and Discord in the World Political Economy. Princeton: Princeton University Press. (AH)
• Ted Hopf. 1998. “The Promise of Constructivism in International Relations Theory.” International Security 23(1): 170-200
• Thucydides. The Peloponnesian War. Book 1, paras 1-23, 66-88, 118-24, 140-46; Book 4, paras 37-51; BookV, Melian dialogue; Book 6, paras 84-116.
• Walt, Stephen 1999. “Rigor or Rigor Mortis? Rational Choice and Security Studies,” International Security, 23, 4, 5-48, and responses in 24, 2, 56-73, 97-106.
• Walt, Stephen. The Origins of Alliances, chs 1,2.
• Waltz, Kenneth. 1979. Theory of International Politics, chs. 4-8.
• Wendt, Alexander. 1999. Social Theory of International Politics, Cambridge University Press. Ch.1, 5-8.

Order Program Outcomes Level of Contribution
1 2 3 4 5
1 Having knowledge and thought about actual topics and problems together with their historical, social and cultural aspects Having knowledge and thought about actual topics and problems together with their historical, social and cultural aspects Having and using advanced knowledge and comprehension supported by textbooks including actual knowledge in international relations literature, materials and the other scientific resources Having and using advanced knowledge and comprehension supported by textbooks including actual knowledge in international relations literature, materials and the other scientific resources
2 Analyzing data, ideas and concepts of foreign policy and international relations, determining complex events and topics, making discussions and developing new suggestions in accordance with researches Analyzing data, ideas and concepts of foreign policy and international relations, determining complex events and topics, making discussions and developing new suggestions in accordance with researches Having conscious about professional and scientific ethics Having conscious about professional and scientific ethics
3 Having the skill about methods and techniques in reaching knowledge Having the skill about methods and techniques in reaching knowledge
4 Having skill to improve career in the jobs such as attaché and ambassador Having skill to improve career in the jobs such as attaché and ambassador
5 Introducing those who are interested in international events with the topics of international relations and teaching clearly the problems of international relations and the types of solutions Introducing those who are interested in international events with the topics of international relations and teaching clearly the problems of international relations and the types of solutions Having the skills to take initiatives, capacity for team-working and open-minded Having the skills to take initiatives, capacity for team-working and open-minded Using Turkish well, having a good written and oral communication and also having ability of empathy Using Turkish well, having a good written and oral communication and also having ability of empathy
6 Accessing, examining and elucidating with scientific methods to the knowledge of international relations and expanding literature about international relations Accessing, examining and elucidating with scientific methods to the knowledge of international relations and expanding literature about international relations
Evaluation System
Semester Studies Contribution Rate
1. Ara Sınav 30
1. Ödev 70
Total 100
1. Yıl İçinin Başarıya 50
1. Final 50
Total 100
ECTS - Workload Activity Quantity Time (Hours) Total Workload (Hours)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours) 16 3 48
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 16 3 48
Mid-terms 1 20 20
Assignment 1 20 20
Final examination 1 20 20
Total Workload 156
Total Workload / 25 (Hours) 6.24
dersAKTSKredisi 6